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Circulation Service

Reciprocal Faculty Borrowing Program: a program of the Research Libraries Advisory Committee to OCLC

a program of the Research Libraries Advisory Committee to OCLC

 

Faculty responsibilities:
Ask CLW Circulation Staff for relevant information about the institution they plan to visit.

Present the proper identification when requesting a card from CLW staff.

Observe the regulations of the lending library.

Return borrowed materials on or before the due date, in person or by mail. Return recalled materials immediately, in person or by express mail.

Pay any fines or other charges incurred due to late return of materials or damage to materials.


To promote and facilitate scholarly research and communication among members of their respective faculties, the Curtis Laws Wilson library is among the OCLC member research libraries which have established a program to provide greater access to scholarly materials. The home institution determines who is eligible for a Reciprocal Faculty Borrowing Program card. The lending library determines whether the card will be accepted for on-site use and/or borrowing.
Materials may be used on the premises of the owning library or may be borrowed, depending on the policies of the lending library. Privileges vary from institution to institution, and are not set or affected by the privileges allowed by Missouri S&T. Faculty members may call the Circulation Desk at 341-4008, or the Reference Desk at 341-4007 for more information about specific member institutions.
Library Circulation Staff will need to see your university ID and know the duration of your stay in the area of the institution you wish to visit in order to issue a Reciprocal Faculty Borrowing Program card.
Please note that this is a program of privileges. At its discretion, a participating institution may suspend the privileges of its own faculty members, or of the faculty members of another participating institution.

 

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