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Public Computer Policies
  1. Users conducting academic research have first priority to use of these computers, followed by those pursuing other goals. The Library may on occasion restrict use of the computers temporarily to facilitate access for a class or for computer maintenance. Your understanding is appreciated.

  2. Children are welcome to use the computers, but parents are responsible for their child's behavior and what they are viewing on the computer. More information on the library and children can be found here.

  3. Viewing pornography on public computer terminals creates a hostile work environment, as defined by Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Publicly displaying explicit sexual material is also prohibited by Missouri Revised Statutes Chapter 573. The Library will take action against individuals viewing this material, up to and including permanently revoking all library privileges.

    See also: UM System Human Resources Policy 510: Sexual Harassment

  4. Use of computer equipment for recreational purposes such as game playing, Instant Messaging or chatting may deter others from using workstations for educational or research purposes, and otherwise makes the Library less conducive to study. If necessary, Library staff will intervene to ensure optimal access to computers for educational and research purposes.

  5. Damaging or changing the computer hardware or software, using the computers with another person's login, illegally distributing copyrighted material or infringing on copyrighted material, and sending un-welcomed email or damaging programs are examples of forbidden activities. For more information, some of the policies addressing acceptable use of computer equipment that we will enforce are at the links below.

    See:  UM System Acceptable Use Policy

    See: Missouri S&T Acceptable Use Policy

  6. We welcome the use of laptops and other personal computing devices in the Library. Users may connect personal equipment only to the wireless network or to ports designated for such use. Users may not unplug any Library equipment or cables for any reason. Use of personal equipment, such as extension, adaptor, or power cords must not pose a safety hazard for others.

 

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